Now Offering: Utility Worker Traffic Control course

We are happy to announce that we are now offering a Utility Worker Traffic Control course. This course was designed for utility companies that opt out from taking the the MOT Intermediate and/or MOT Advanced courses as well as to replace the FDOT MOT Restricted Activities course that was discounted on July 15, 2014. After completion of this 8 hour course, students will receive a Safety Links certificate and a “basic” flagger certification from the FDOT MOT Administrator. 

If you would like more information regarding this course, click here, or contact Fran at 407-705-3899.

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NOW OFFERING: Maintenance of Traffic (MOT) Advanced

Safety Links is now offering MOT Advanced training for both on-site and open enrollment at our training facility in Orlando.

We are currently accepting students in our upcoming MOT Advance training that is scheduled to take place on February 6-7, 2015. If you would like to register for this course, click here.

For more information regarding this or all other MOT courses, contact Nikki or Fran at 1-800-768-7036.

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Spill Response Preparedness

Are you and your employees prepared on how to respond when faced with spills of hazardous materials and/or waste? Before deciding whether the 40 hr. or 24 hr. Hazwoper is suitable for your needs, you must determine the types of emergency situations that you may face.

In order to do so, several factors must be taken into consideration such as:

  • The types and quantities of materials at your site
  • The types of processes being conducted
  • The availability of local emergency resources
  • The potential impact on your employees and the community.

What is HAZWOPER?

HAZWOPER stands for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response. Once you have evaluated and determined the potential emergency situations for your operations, the next step is to review OSHA’s Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.120, also known as the HAZWOPER standard.

When reviewing the HAZWOPER you will come across Sections B through P which covers hazardous waste operations such as clean-up procedures at hazardous waste sites or operations involving hazardous waste at treatment, storage and disposal facilities. Thus, you will notice that Section Q only covers emergency response.

It is important that you address appropriate issues when researching HAZWOPER issues and/or choosing a training provider that will best identify your needs. It is not uncommon for people to enroll in a HAZWOPER class to learn about spill response only to find out later that the class focuses on hazardous waste sites.

What is a Hazardous Substance?

When it comes to chemicals, a variety of definitions for “hazardous” exist. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is concerned with the hazards of materials in transport and orients its definitions of hazardous toward air transportation and other specific transport concerns. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is concerned with the impact on the environment when materials are released or disposed and makes hazardous determinations based on environmental and human health risks.

OSHA is concerned with the hazards of materials to which workers might be exposed in the workplace. Any chemical that might present a health or physical hazard is defined as a hazardous chemical under the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard. Health hazards include any adverse health effect from irritants to corrosives or carcinogens.

The HAZWOPER standard applies to releases of hazardous substances. Although it is an OSHA standard, it does not use the Hazard Communication Standard for hazardous chemicals. The HAZWOPER standard traces its origin to an EPA law, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund), and derives its definition of hazardous substances from CERCLA regulations. The CERCLA definition is based on the substance’s potential impact on the environment and the community.

The basic idea is to include chemicals that would present a significant hazard to people or the environment if spilled or released. Chemicals that do not fall into one of these categories might still present a slight hazard to employees and emergency responders, but technically do not trigger HAZWOPER requirements.

Training requirements

The HAZWOPER standard establishes five basic training requirements related to chemical emergency response:

1.            First Responder Awareness Level

2.            First Responder Operations Level

3.            Hazardous Materials Technician

4.            Hazardous Materials Specialist

5.            On-Scene Incident Commander

First Responder “Awareness” Level training is required for individuals who are likely to witness or discover a hazardous substance release and who would take no action beyond notification of the proper authorities. Even if you do not have a spill team and do not plan to respond to spill emergencies, your employees might need First Responder Awareness Level training. This training potentially could include everyone from the machine operator to the security guard.

First Responder “Operations” Level training is required for individuals who respond to releases or potential releases as part of the initial response. They are trained to respond in a defensive manner to protect people, property and the environment. Defensive actions are those taken from a safe distance to keep the spill from spreading and to prevent exposures. Examples include covering drains, placing spill booms or barriers and barricading access points, all from safe distances.

Hazardous Materials “Technician” training is required for individuals who will respond to the release or potential release for the purpose of stopping the release. In other words, they are responding in an offensive manner. They usually will be close to the source of the release and, therefore, have a high potential for harmful exposures. Examples include over packing a leaking drum or collecting contaminated absorbents.

The investment in training, as well as in procedures and equipment, substantially increases when moving up to the “Technician” level of response. Technician level calls for at least 24 hours of training. Personnel also must demonstrate competency in several areas, including the emergency response plan, instrumentation, the incident command system, selection and use of personal protective equipment, hazard and risk assessment, containment and control, decontamination, termination procedures and basic chemistry and toxicology.

Hazardous Materials “Specialist” training is similar to the Hazardous Materials Technician training. The specialist however, is required to have greater knowledge of the chemicals to which he or she might respond, as well as to act as a liaison with governmental authorities. He or she also provides support to the hazardous materials technician. Again, at least twenty-four hours of training is required.

On-Scene Incident Commander training is required for any response beyond the First Responder Awareness Level. The role of the incident commander is to assume control of the incident scene. The incident commander must be someone on-site who is designated and trained to be in charge of the incident. The required training will vary with the level and complexity of the response. The minimum required training is 24 hours.

Remember, like all OSHA requirements, these training requirements are a minimum. Based on the nature of your facility and its hazards, additional training may be necessary. It is also important for each emergency responder to stay current. With that said all levels of HAZWOPER training requires annual refresher training or a demonstration of competency.

By allowing a HazMat team to respond to nonemergency spills, a facility provides an excellent way to maintain skills that would be needed in an emergency. Whatever you choose to do, you must remember to document the training and competency evaluations.

If you have any questions regarding Hazwoper training or if you would like to book a Hazwoper class at your site, click here 

 

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RECALL: Fiskars® 32-Inch Bypass Lopper Shears

Recall Summary

Name of product:

Fiskars® 32-Inch Bypass Lopper Shears

Hazard:

The lopper handles can break when attempting to cut branches, posing a risk of serious injury and laceration.

Remedy:View DetailsReplaceConsumer Contact:

Fiskars toll-free at (855) 544-0151 anytime or visit Fiskars’ website at www2.fiskars.com and click on “Product Notifications” for more information.

Report an Incident Involving this Product

Recall Details

In conjunction with

Units

About 277,000 in the U.S. and 11,000 in Canada

Description

This recall involves Fiskars Titanium Bypass Lopper shears with model number 6954. The lopper shears have 32-inch dark orange steel handles and black rubber grips with a gray strip. Plastic gears connected to the pruning blades allow the consumers to open and close the pruning blades by moving the handles.  “FISKARS” is printed on one handle and product identification information, including model number 6954, is printed on a label on the opposite handle above the barcode.

Incidents/Injuries

The firm has received 11 reports of incidents involving lopper handles breaking, including reports of bruising and lacerations, some required stitches to the head and face.

Remedy

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled lopper shears and contact Fiskars to receive a replacement lopper.

Sold exclusively at

Home Depot stores nationwide and online at HomeDepot.com from May 2011 through June 2014 for about $40

Distributor

Fiskars Brands Inc., of Madison, Wis.

Manufactured in

China

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RECALL: Bad Boy Buggies Off-Road Vehicles

Recall Date: September 25, 2014

Recall Number: 14-281

Bad Boy Buggies Recalls Recreational Off-Road Vehicles Due to Crash Hazard

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Consumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Recall Summary

Name of Product: Bad Boy Buggies Off-Road Vehicles

Hazard: Incorrect parking brake adjustments and improperly bled brake lines can diminish a consumer’s braking ability, posing a crash hazard.

Remedy: Repair

Consumer Contact: Bad Boy Buggies toll-free at (855) 738-3711 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.badboybuggies.com and click on “Recall Information” at the bottom of the page for more information.

Recall Details

Units: About 4,460

Description: This recall involves gas- and electric-powered, four-wheeled recreational vehicles manufactured by Bad Boy Buggies. The vehicles have bench seats for the driver and passenger, a cargo bed in the rear of the two-person model, and a rear-facing back seat in the four-person model. The recreational vehicles were sold in black, camouflage, green and red, and have 1¾ inch tubular steel exterior frames. The recalled off-road vehicles have serial numbers ranging from 8004970 through 8012901. Serial numbers are printed on a plate or label on the steering column. Brand and model names are printed on the side and front panels of the vehicle. For a list of model names included in the recall, click here:http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/Bad-Boy-Buggies-Recalls-Recreational-Off-Road-Vehicles/

Incidents/Injuries: None reported.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled vehicles and contact Bad Boy Buggies or an authorized dealer for a free repair.

Sold at: Bad Boy Buggies dealers nationwide from August 2012 through May 2014 for between $9,600 and $14,400.

Manufacturer: Bad Boy Buggies, of Augusta, Ga.

Manufactured in: United States

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OSHA Reporting Changes

Previously, employers had to report the following events to OSHA:

  • All work-related fatalities
  • All work-related hospitalizations of three or more employees

Now, employers have to report the following events to OSHA:

  •  All work-related fatalities
  • All work-related in-patient hospitalizations of one or more employees
  • All work-related amputations
  • All work-related losses of an eye

Employers must report work-related fatalities within 8 hours of finding out about it.

For any in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or eye loss employers must report the incident within 24 hours of learning about it.

Only fatalities occurring within 30 days of the work-related incident must be reported to OSHA. Further, for an inpatient hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye, then incidents must be reported to OSHA only if they occur within 24 hours of the work-related incident.

Employers have three options for reporting the event:

1. By telephone to the nearest OSHA Area Office during normal business hours.

2. By telephone to the 24-hour OSHA hotline (1-800-321-OSHA or 1-800-321-6742).

3. OSHA is developing a new means of reporting events electronically, which will be released soon and accessible on OSHA’s website.

For additional information please go to: https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014/

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RECALL: Kidde hard-wired smoke and combination smoke/carbon monoxide (CO) alarms

Name of product:

Kidde hard-wired smoke and combination smoke/carbon monoxide (CO) alarms 

Hazard:

The alarms could fail to alert consumers of a fire or a CO incident following a power outage.

View Details Replace Consumer Contact:

Kidde toll-free at (844) 553-9011 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.kidde.com and click on Recalls for more information.

Units

About 1.2 million in the United States and about 112,000 in Canada

Description

This recall involves Kidde residential smoke alarm model i12010S with manufacture dates between December 18, 2013 and May 13, 2014, combination smoke/CO alarm il2010SCO with manufacture dates between December 30, 2013 and May 13, 2014, and combination smoke/CO alarm model KN-COSM-IBA with manufacture date between October 22, 2013 and May 13, 2014. They are hard-wired into a home’s electric power. The il2010S and il2010SCO come with sealed 10 year batteries inside. The KN-COSM-IBA model has a compartment on the front for installation of replaceable AA backup batteries. The alarms are white, round and measure about 5 to 6 inches in diameter. Kidde is engraved on the front of the alarm. Kidde, the model number and manufacture dates are printed on a label on the back of the alarm. “Always On” is also engraved on the front of alarms with sealed 10-year batteries.

Incidents/Injuries

None reported

Remedy

Consumers should immediately contact Kidde for a free replacement smoke or combination smoke/CO alarm. Consumers should keep using the recalled alarms until they install replacement alarms.

Sold at

CED, City Electric Supply, HD Supply, Home Depot, Menards Inc. and other retailers, electrical distributors and online at Amazon.com, HomeDepot.com and shopkidde.com from January 2014 through July 2014 for between $30 and $50.

Importer

Walter Kidde Portable Equipment Inc., of Mebane, N.C.

Manufacturer

Fyrnetics Ltd. of Hong Kong

Manufactured in

China

Click here for more information.

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Now Offering: Breathing Air Testing

Breathing Air Testing

Compressed air has many applications, including its use for breathing air. Some people breathe compressed air using Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) and others use airline respirators which are supplied air from various types of compressors.

In OSHA’s respirator protective equipment standard (1910.134) they require “the employer to provide employees using atmosphere-supplying respirators (supplied-air and SCBA) with breathing gases of high purity” and further state that “Compressed breathing air shall meet at least the requirements for Grade D breathing air described in ANSI/Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification for Air, G-7.1”

Simply put employers on an annual basis must ensure that breathing air….

  • Has 19.5 to 23.5% oxygen
  • Has less than 5 milligrams per cubic meter of Hyrdrocarbons (i.e. Oils)
  • Has less than 10 ppm of Carbon Monoxide
  • Has less than 1000 ppm of Carbon Dioxide and
  • Lack of “noticeable odor”.

For more information, click here

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MOT Changes effective July 15

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) has implemented changes to the Maintenance of Traffic training requirements. As a valued customer of Safety Links, we will keep you abreast of changes in training and/or standards that affect your company. If you have questions or need more information, do not hesitate to contact us.

Effective July 15, 2014


MOT Basic Flagger:

  • All flaggers (existing and new) will have to take a new FDOT approved MOT Basic Flagger certification course by January 1, 2015 and be included in the new online database or they will not be allowed to flag on FDOT projects.
  • The new MOT Basic Flagger certification course has been standardized to ensure consistent training throughout the state, and will be released on July 15, 2014.
  • Only Approved MOT Training Providers can provide the MOT Basic Flagger certification in the State of Florida.
  • The flagger must successfully demonstrate their flagging knowledge and skills to an approved provider.
  • After the skills assessment is successfully completed, the provider will issue an immediate temporary certification.
  • Once the student’s data is entered into the MOT Training database, the permanent MOT Basic Flagger Certificate will be available in the database for printing by that student.
  • The MOT Basic Flagger certification will expire four years after its issuance.

MOT Intermediate and Refresher:

  • All training must be conducted using the FDOT provided course material.
  • Only authorized MOT providers and instructors can provide MOT training in the State of Florida.
  • After the exam is successfully completed, the provider will issue an immediate temporary certification.
  • Once the student’s data is entered into the MOT Training database, the permanent MOT Intermediate Certificate will be available in the database for printing by that student.
  • The MOT Intermediate certification will expire four years after its issuance.

MOT Advanced and Refresher:

  • All training must be conducted using the FDOT provided course material.
  • Only authorized MOT providers and instructors can provide MOT training in the State of Florida.
  • After the exam is successfully completed, the provider will issue an immediate temporary certification.
  • Once the student’s data is entered into the MOT Training database, the permanent MOT Advanced Certificate will be available in the database for printing by that student.
  • The MOT Advanced certification will expire four years after its issuance.

MOT Restricted Activities:

  • Discontinued course. Must take the 16-Hour Intermediate course.


If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me or Fran at fsoto@safetylinks.net or 407-705-3899

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RECALL: Porter-Cable Fixed-Base Production Routers

Recall Date: July 2, 2014

Recall Number: 14-221

Porter-Cable Fixed-Base Production Routers Recalled Due to Electrical Shock Hazard

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Consumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Recall Summary

Name of Product: Fixed-base routers and router bases

Hazard: The router base handles are not insulated, posing an electric shock hazard.

Remedy:  Replace

Consumer Contact:  Porter-Cable toll-free at (888) 344-7973 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, email support.portercable@sbdinc.com , or online at www.portercable.com, click on Important Safety Notice/Recalls, then select 2014 for more information.

Recall Details

Units: About 100,000 in the United States and about 7,800 in Canada

Description: Four Porter-Cable 3 1/4 horsepower, electric, fixed-base production routers and one production router base are being recalled. The recalled routers are about 11 inches tall and 7 inches wide. The top of the router motor is black plastic and has the on/off switch for the router. The base is painted gray and has two side handles, an adjuster ring on the top and a clamp screw on the rear. The side handles on the base of recalled routers have no insulation. The Porter-Cable name and logo are on the front of the base. The recalled routers and base were manufactured from 1990 to April 2014.

Click here for the list of router models being recalled: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/Porter-Cable-Fixed-Base-Production-Routers-Recalled/

The router model number and the manufacture date code are on a metal plate on the back of the upper motor housing. The date code consists of the year of manufacture, the week of manufacture and the manufacturing plant code in the YYYY WW-XX format.

The router base is model number 75361 and is also sold separately. The model number is located on the side of the base opposite the Porter-Cable label.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled routers and router bases, unplug the routers and contact Porter-Cable for a free replacement router base with insulation on the handles.

Sold at: Major industrial equipment suppliers and woodworker suppliers nationwide from 1990 to April 2014 for about $85 to $690 depending on the model.

Manufacturer/Importer/Distributor: Black & Decker (U.S.) Inc., dba Porter-Cable, Towson, Md.

Manufactured in: Mexico.

(Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/Porter-Cable-Fixed-Base-Production-Routers-Recalled/)

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